December 17, 2012

Recommended Reading: Welcome to the Jungle


 One of the most frustrating things about the music industry is how hard it can be to find a "real" job.
You know, the kind mom and dad would approve of with cubicles and benefits and normal hours. They're pretty hard to come by. But, for a big portion of the music industry the reliability that comes with a steady job isn't even an option because, with some exceptions, that just isn't a reality for most composers, designers, engineers, producers, studio musicians, etc. That kind of world can be hard to deal with and even harder to succeed in. That is precisely why I wanted to share Welcome to the Jungle  and the freelance advice it offers with you.

This site, and accompanying book, Welcome to the Jungle: A Success Manual for Music and Audio Freelancers, is actually written by Jim Klein, a professor where I studied music industry, but his experience speaks for itself. Klein has had several different roles in the music industry over his career and he's been freelancing as an engineer, musician, producer, songwriter, and composer since the early 80's. He served as Chief Engineer for a major studio, written several Hot 100 singles, and written jingles for Coke, Pillsbury, Canon, ATT, and more. His scores have been featured on the Olympics, Oprah, and The Today Show, among others and he won Daytime Emmy Awards for his work on ABC's All My Children. Now, he is taking that experience and telling you, through his book and site, about what it takes to succeed as a freelancer.

Welcome to the Jungle  deals with the issues and concerns faced by freelancers in a tough market- everything from the problem of parents not understanding to the reality of dealing with the uncertainties of being a freelancer and what clients will expect from you. So, if you're interested in pursuing one of those "uncertain" career paths (and honestly isn't any music career) check it out. It's got some great information, real-world insights, and a few stories you'll probably be able to empathize with- and I'm sure there's more of it to come.